Skip to main content

Selling eggs

The pullets are laying and the fridge is full of eggs.
I have friends that purchase them but not on a regular basis so sometimes I have few and sometimes I have lots.  This week a young entreprenuer homeschool girl I know asked if I had enough eggs to sell at her garden stand.
With more than six dozen on hand, I said "Yes".

a mixed dozen ~ cream, brown, & green

But then I started wondering,
"How much should I charge?"
"Would people want 1/2 dozens or full dozens?"
"Should I mix in the green eggs with the brown?"
"Would people pay more for green just because they were pretty or different?"

mint green eggs

So I'm asking you!
How would you want your farm fresh free range eggs
and
what would you pay for them?

Comments

  1. Just found your blog through Oppulent Cottage's blog. Not sure about what to charge for the eggs, but I was reading the story of how y'all contracted and built your home yourselves in less than six months. We did the same thing in 1995. We both worked during the day and worked over here at night and on the weekends. We sub contracted out the major parts, but did all the trim, window and door hanging, painting, papering, cleaning, and the yard ourselves. Save buckets of money doing it ourselves. That was the only way to build this house. Now I would love a smaller farm house like yours, but we will be staying here until the nursing home calls probably.
    Love your home and have a great holiday weekend.

    Kim

    ReplyDelete
  2. I get my (farm fresh free range) eggs at our local co-op every week and pay $2.75 per 1 dozen. They are usually a beautiful mixture of browns and aquas. I prefer the mixture because I love seeing how different all the eggs can be! I really like your packaging too, that always helps ;)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Why not sell both half and full dozen? You can charge a little more than half for the half dozen, to try and get people to buy the full dozen. I have been selling ours all mixed, light brown, dark brown and green together. I do it because my green are smaller than the rest, so I figure the unique green color makes up for the slightly smaller egg.

    I do really like your clear containers, especially the round half dozen. Where do you get those? It really gives a unique visual presentation.

    ReplyDelete
  4. variety is the spice of life!
    all colors baby!

    Rebecca
    ~the blue/green ones are my fav!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Mixed dozen as they are different sizes. I would pay $2.75 and charge $1.50 or $1.75 for a half dozen depending on the size of eggs (gotta cover packaging cost...) Fresh eggs are so so good and I love how soft and "creamy" they are.

    ReplyDelete
  6. When I was selling eggs, I would put 3 greens/blues in each dozen. (I only had 2 hens that laid these eggs, so I didn't have enough to do a full dozen of them.) I mainly sold in a suburban area and folks really got a kick out of them.

    My eggs were not organic. I sold them for $2.50/dozen. I probably could have upped my price to $3.00 or more, but didn't. Nowadays, local farm-fresh eggs go from $3.00/dz to $4.00/dz or more (for organic).

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hmmm. Maybe eggs are just higher here. I saw cage free brown eggs at the grocery store today for $3.69. I do like the mix of a few green in there.

    Countryman,
    I bought the containers at eggcartonsonline.com They have the little round ones too. You have to buy 100 though. I'll have egg cartons forever!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hi Kim..the eggs look great! Over here we pay about $5.50 per dozen of organic, free range eggs! It sounds like they are a lot cheaper in your neck of the woods.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Organic eggs at our local Farmer's Market go for about $5 a dozen. At the grocery stores, they're $3.99. Depending on if yours are organic or free range, I'd just go with what you see locally.
    BTW-I love the clear containers!

    ReplyDelete
  10. We buy ours from a friend for $3 a dozen, which is less than what you would buy them for in the store (free range, organic, that is) and a good deal to us! Eggs are one of the few things I am picky about.

    ReplyDelete
  11. We sold ours really cheap, $1.50 but you could definitely get more. We also sold them by the dozen and mixed colors. I think the 1/2 dozen is an excellent idea too and I love the container!

    ReplyDelete
  12. I sell mine for 2.75 a dozen, or $4 for a dozen & a half. But mine are neither free range, nor organic. Just fresh. :)

    ReplyDelete
  13. p.s. we bring out empty egg cartons back in when we go to purchase the eggs. Maybe that's why they are cheaper--less packaging cost. So maybe you could offer a 'container refund' sort of deduction for people who recycle your containers?

    ReplyDelete
  14. On the east coast, we ask for a $4 donation for our cage free, free range, organic eggs. They aren't certified organic, but we only use organic feed for them. The local farmer's market sells them for $5. For insurance reasons, if anyone gets sick and blames our eggs, we have to say we are not selling them but asking for a donation toward the feed.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Wow! Green eggs are expensive:) I wish I could remember what we sold eggs for as a kid. All I remember is washing and washing eggs. They did not bring out the entrepreneur in me. Your cartons and your logo are perfect.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Out here, I pay 3.89/dozen for free range/organic/grain fed. In IL, I would buy free range/local at the farmers market or co-op for $4.50/dozen. They were worth it. I would love to see green eggs!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Wow! You got a lot of answers!
    I say mix the colors... I would be the type to cook up scrambled eggs with each color and let my family taste test!
    I have no clue what you should charge.
    I think it would be neat for the buyers to have some information about what kind of chickens lay which color egg - I'd love to have a 'fact' sheet included with the eggs... that would be worth paying even more money for the eggs!

    ReplyDelete
  18. I mix them and charge $3/dozen. All the colors are so pretty together :-)

    ReplyDelete
  19. I like the mix! But, some people are "funny" about stuff like that. They can go somewhere else-LOL!!
    I pay $2.50 a dozen....and that's organic, free range.

    ReplyDelete
  20. By me they mix the colors and on avergae, they are around $2-2.50 for organic, free range and/or pasture fed. If you eggs are from pasture fed chickens, that's a bonus in my area so defintely sell that!

    ReplyDelete
  21. I pay 2.18 at the grocers for a dozen brown eggs so I would think like someone else said you should account for packaging. And to be honest I expect farm fresh to be a lil more(so worth it) and as for color as a consumer I would very easily pay 3.50 per dozen for the blue ones.Just my opinion either way they are beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
  22. I'd definitely buy a mixed-dozen, if given the opportunity.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Hi Kim I buy mine from the Amish here in KY for $1.50 a dozen all colors.

    ReplyDelete
  24. You won't believe what we have to pay for farm-fresh, organic eggs here in Dallas - $5.50! And we're happy if one or two of them are green :) It's worth it to us though, because we love supporting our local farmers. (Local being an hour outside of the city.) There's no telling what I might pay for a whole dozen blue or green eggs!

    ReplyDelete
  25. I'm glad to hear a high price especially closer to home. Last year I sold them for $3/dozen. But like I said in the grocery store they are $3.50-$4 and that is not farm fresh. This week I priced them at $3.50 but they were marked up a little at the stand.
    Thanks everyone for your input! I knew I could count on you.

    ReplyDelete
  26. I don't understand paying more for colored eggs. I sell my eggs for $5/dz and mix in at least one green or blue and one speckled in every dozen. The going rate here is about $6/dz

    ReplyDelete
  27. oh yeah...all colors for sure!!!

    we used to charge $2.50 back in the day and they were free range not oranic. we would charge more now.

    hope y'all are doing great!! :)

    ReplyDelete
  28. Looks like you got a lot of input, so I won't try to add to it. It means a lot to get eggs laid by chickens who don't spent their lives in cages.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Hi Kim,
    My hubby sells ours where he works for $2.00 a doz. I think it's too cheap and figured we could get at least $3.00 for them but hubby didn't want to charge 'the guys' too much. The price of 'cage free' is about the same here as it is down where you are so that tells me yours and ours are worth more. Cage free just means they're in a huge building on the ground in one big flock with no fresh green grass or bugs. I'd sell them for at least $3 and I'd leave them mixed. If you have a customer who asks for all brown or all green etc...you can always separate them but they may have to wait until you get enough for them. Let us know how it goes ok! Have a great day.
    Maura :)

    ReplyDelete
  30. At our small town Farmers Market in North West Washington You can expect to buy a dozen eggs for $4.00 and if you buy weekly it goes down to $3.50.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

So what do you think of that?