Skip to main content

Home on the range

Yesterday was homecoming for our boy's new calves.  10 of them.  I went along to the ranch to be the photographer but other than that this was their deal. 


They did the talking, the helping, the learning, and the paying.  It promises to be a big investment in time and money.  Hopefully their pasture raised Black Angus will be profitable.  Because increasing numbers of people want to know where their food comes from, we think they will do quite well.


The calves were penned up ready to work.  They looked so little until they went in the chute, then they showed how big they really were.


The boys helped give them immunizations and ear tags.




And helped with the castration too.  Ouch!


J3 thought he was a little up close and personal for this procedure!


The calf didn't feel sorry for him in the least.


Then they were loaded up and delivered.


Final instructions from the rancher and their adventure has begun.


They still look a little lost ( the calves not the boys, ok, well maybe both) Hopefully that won't last long.


They look good out there.

Welcome home, boys.

To see the beginning of their adventure go here.

Comments

  1. and they are in pain! trying to cool their poor toushies! :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Congrats to your boys! What a wonderful opportunity for them!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh, the adventure begins. I raise a few polled Herefords for many years. It was always my travel and vacation fund. I live in town now so my adventure is over. They will have fun but the learning curve has just begun!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Good for them! We raise grass-fed Black Angus X. Most of our customers are, as you said, people who care where there food comes from.

    Glad to see they castrated them early. It's a lot easier on the calf and the one doing the castrating. ALWAYS do them early.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Congrats on your new additions to the farm.

    ReplyDelete
  6. What a wonderful and educational adventure your boys are embarking on. I am so impressed with their initiative.

    ReplyDelete
  7. They are beautiful!... I could never eat them once they came to my farm. Hence, no cows here, much to my husbands chagrin.

    ReplyDelete
  8. What a great adventure for your boys to do! I do hope they enjoy it and makes some $$$$ in the process!

    Have a Great Day!
    Angela

    ReplyDelete
  9. That is just fantastic! I really think their venture is wonderful, and hope all goes well. As you say, loads of people now want to know where their food is coming from....
    Oh, and that, er, 'castr...' word. Eeek, makes me erreewwwghgh every time !

    ReplyDelete
  10. That is a really good thing for boys...what a summer they will have! :D

    ReplyDelete
  11. This will be a great experience. Now they can be real cowboys. : )

    ReplyDelete
  12. I'm really impressed with your boys! They could be on to something big. I wish them luck. I will e-mail you about my sign in a few weeks. I have company coming:) Always a good thing.

    ReplyDelete
  13. How exciting for the boys to have gotten to the meat of their adventure... ugh, sorry, couldn't resist that!
    You must be so proud of them!
    I can't wait to hear more.

    ReplyDelete
  14. That's great! I can't wait to follow along with their adventure! And what a great farmer (rancher? We're in the east, so we have farmers...lol) for teaching the boys!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

So what do you think of that?